TWISTED WESTERN: Bolos

TWISTED WESTERN: Bolos

by Halley Oxford Comma February 18, 2018

Does it get more badass than a woman rocking a bolo? You’d be hard-pressed to convince us it does.
 
 
What if I’m not sure I’m the “bolo” type?
Sure you are! Since its initial emergence into mainstream popularity in the 1970s and 80s, the bolo has evolved, expanded, and transformed into such a broad collection of variations, that there is a bolo for everyone these days – from dainty gold to chunky and bold. But our particular favorite, of course, is the original – leather cords, metal aglets (silver tips), and intricate carvings, accented with other metals, or adorned with the quintessential turquoise of rockabilly western.
 
Yeah, but how do I wear it?
That’s the best part: There’s no wrong way to wear a bolo. While it was originally intended as a men’s necktie, it has long since taken on the freedom of spirit that Double D Ranch and southern rock is all about.
 
                  Traditional: Cinched at the neck and under the collar of a button-down shirt, it’s an excellent polishing touch to a full-fledged western look.
 
                  Long & Loose: By lowering the slide, your bolo transitions to more of a “necklace” feel and adds dimension and edge to anything from a bohemian dress to a plain white tee.
 
                  Tight & Trendy: Chokers are making a major comeback right now, and depending on the length of the leather, some bolos can be doubled around the neck accomplish a choker-like look, but with the added element of a gorgeous slide and tails.
 
Anywhere In Between: One of the awesome things about a bolo is its versatility – it can adapt to accent any neckline and it can feel like a completely different accessory every time you wear it. And BONUS: The adjustable length also makes it ideal for layering.
Whether you opt for tight and traditional or loose and lovely, as long as you wear it with confidence, you’re wearing it right.
 
FUN FACTS:
  • Bolos are the official neckwear of three southwestern states: Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas.
  • “Bolo” comes from the word “boleadora”, which is an Argentine lariat. There is some debate whether it’s “bolo” or “bola”, but both have been deemed correct.
  • Before they were neckwear, bolos were actually hatbands. Victor Cedarstaff is credited with “inventing” the new style, having hung his around his neck for fear that he would lose it when his hat blew off. (Wikipedia)



Halley Oxford Comma
Halley Oxford Comma

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